Trillium Ovatum - Western Trillium
Trillium ovatum - Western Trillium is a showy perennial that can reach 45 centimeters (18 inches) in height.  It prefers moist to wet
sites that are mostly shaded in woods and stream banks.  This lily is commonly found at low to middle elevations throughout the
Willamette Valley.

To identify this beautiful lily, look for leaves in whorls of 3 which are triangular-oval in shape with a pointed tip.  The flowers start off in
early spring as white, but fade to purple with age.  In late spring or early summer, the flowers produce a capsule full of a sticky mass
of seeds and starch globules.

This species is a must for Oregon reforestation projects as it attracts many pollinating insects as well as being a recognized staple
to Pacific Northwest forest dwellers.
Trifolium tridentatum - Tomcat Clover is a delicate annual reaching heights of 60 centimeters (24 inches).  It prefers sun and moist,
well-drained soils that can be nutrient poor.  This clover is found in grassy meadows, fields and pastures throughout the Willamette Valley
at low to middle elevations.

To identify this species, look for a hairy herb with compound, 3-foliate leaflets.  The flowers are white tinged with pink and gathered in
dense heads at the end of branches.

This species is especially useful in meadows and fields that have been disturbed with poor soils.  The nitrogen fixing bacteria located in
this plant's roots will add fertility to much depleted soils.
Vicia gigantea - Grand Vetch is a succulent perennial that reaches 2 meters (7 feet) in height.  It is found in moist, sunny sites such as
forest and stream edges.  This pea occurs at low elevations throughout the Willamette Valley.

The leaves are compound with 18-26 leaflets.  The flowers are the most identifiable characteristic as they are yellowish to orange in color
located on a 1 sided stalk of 7-20 clustered flowers.

This species is best used for stream and forestation enhancement projects as this pea will add fertility to the soils in which they grow.
Viola glabella - Yellow-Wood Violet is a perennial that reaches 50 centimeters (20 inches) in height.  It prefers to grow in forests,
glades, and along streams in moist, shaded soils.  This violet can be found at all elevations throughout the Willamette Valley.

To identify this plant, look for heart-shaped leaves with a sharply pointed tip.  Each plant produces a solitary flower that is yellow with
the bottom 3 petals having purple lines.

This plant is best used in reforestation projects as it attracts many pollinating insects and grows well along side the Western Trillium.
Viola Glabella - Yellow Wood Violet
Plant Description
Herbaceous
Trillium chloropetalum- Sessile Trillium is a hairless perennial that reaches 40 centimeters (16 inches) in height.  This herbaceous
plant prefers moist soils in open areas of Oregon's forests.  It is commonly found in Olympia, Washington down throughout the
Willamette Valley from low to middle elevations.

To distinguish this lily from the related Western Trillium, look for large, triangular-oval leaves with purple mottling.  The flower lacks
a stock and is not as showy as the Western Trillium.

A unique addition to any reforestation project, as it is less common than it's Western Trillium cousin.  The seeds produce an
oily-rich substance that attract ants and beetles, who carry off the seeds and help disperse the plant to populate other areas.
Trees and Shrubs
moist soils under shaded forests.  It is commonly found throughout the Willamette Valley from low to middle elevations.

The plant's basal leaves resemble a duck's webbed foot, hence another common name for the plant, Duck's Foot.  The most
striking feature of this herbaceous plant is the unique flower.  The sepals and petals bent back, making the flower to appear
inside-out.

Inside-out flowers establish themselves quickly and make an excellent ground cover.  They attract many pollinators to an area,
making them an excellent plant to use in reforestation projects.
Herbaceous
Trillium Chloropetalum - Sessile Trillium
Vancouveria Hexandra
Tellima grandiflora - Fringe-Cup is a perennial that reaches 80 centimeters (31 inches) in height.  It is found in moist, shaded areas such
as forests, glades, thickets, and stream banks.  This species typically grows throughout the Willamette Valley at low to middle elevations.

To identify Fringe-Cup, look for basal leaves that are heart-shaped with shallow lobing and coarse toothing.  The flowers are
greenish-yellow when young and fade to red tipped as they age.  These are bell-shaped with frilly petals and contain a sweet fragrance.

This species is excellent to use in forested sites as it will provide a quick spreading ground cover.
Sparganium emersum - Burreed is an aquatic perennial that reaches 1 meter (3 feet) in height.  It is found in ponds, wetlands, creeks,
and streams at low to middle elevations throughout the Willamette Valley.  This species is usually submerged or floating in shallow
waters, but can be found partly emergent.

The leaves are long and narrow with alternate placement.  The flowers are very minute and numerous, gathering in a globular head.  
These heads are located at the terminal end of the stem.
This species is best used in wetlands where it will stabilize the soil at the bottom of the wetland area and filter through toxins in the
waters.
Vicia Gigantea - Grand Vetch
Tellima Grandiflora - Fringe Cup
Scholls Valley Native Nursery, LLC
PO Box 231088
Tigard, OR 97223
Phone: 503.624.1766
Fax: 503.624.2766