Oplopanax horridus - Devil's Club is an erect to sprawling shrub that reaches 3 meters (10 feet) in height.  It prefers shaded moist site such as
woods, well-drained seepage sites, and along stream beds.  This shrub is found at low to middle elevations throughout the Willamette Valley.

Devils Club are uniquely identifiable plants with their large broad leaves and numerous spines on the tops and bottoms of leaves as well as on
the branches.  The flowers are white, very small, numerous, and clustered in a pyramid.  Fruits are bright red berries.

This plant is a must for restoration sites in moist shaded areas.  The plant can keep browsing down and adds unique diversity to native habitat.
Fraxinus latifolia - Oregon Ash is a 25 meter ( 82 feet) tall tree that grows in moist or wet soils in the Willamette Valley at low elevations.  It
prefers full sun along stream banks and in sloughs.

The unique identification feature of Oregon Ash is the pinnately compound and oppositely arranged leaves.  As this tree ages, the bark becomes
greyish brown and fissured.  The flowers are small and inconspicuous, but the seeds are highly visible.  Each seed is in a winged,
canoe-shaped samara.

This species is best used in riparian projects.  It is a relatively long lived tree.
Gaultheria shallon - Salal is an erect creeping shrub that can reach heights of 1 meter (3 feet).  It is found throughout the Willamette Valley in
coniferous forests and rocky bluffs.  This shrub is highly adaptable and can thrive in sun, shade, moist, dry, infertile or fertile soils.  Salal prefers
low to middle elevations.

Salal can be recognized by its hairy branched stems, pinkish-white bell shaped flowers, and reddish-blue to dark purple fruit.

This evergreen shrub is an important understory species of our coniferous forests, providing habitat and a source of food for birds and wildlife.  
Humans also enjoy their sweet tasting fruit.
Lonicera ciliosa - Orange Honeysuckle is a climbing, widely branching vine that can reach 6 meters (20 feet) in height.  It can be found growing
on shrubs in moist forests from sea level to middle elevations.  

This vine is distinguishable by its rounded opposite leaves and large clusters of bright orange, trumpet-like flowers.  The flowers produce small
red berries in the fall.

Orange Honeysuckle produces a sweet nectar that attracts hummingbirds and butterflies.  This is a great vine to use in reforestation projects
for species diversity.
Lonicera hispidula - California Honeysuckle is a crawling, hairy branched vine.  It is found crawling along the floor of dry open forests and thickets.  
The vine can be found throughout the Willamette Valley at low to middle elevations.

This vine is very similar to Orange Honeysuckle, but has pinkish purple, trumpet-like flowers instead.

This plant is best used in drier, open sites and will help attract pollinators to the area.
Lonicera involucrata - Black Twinberry is a fast growing shrub that can reach 3 meters (10 feet) in height.  It prefers full or partial sun and moist
soils in forests, thickets, stream sides, and swamps from low to subalpine elevations.  This shrub ranges from Canada down to California.  

Black Twinberry forms yellow tubular flowers in pairs.  These produce two black berries throughout the summer, which are nestled by 2 pairs of
purple-maroon bracts.

Due to its speed in growth, this plant is a must for riparian areas to quickly establish roots that help stabilize the site.
Mahonia aquifolium - Tall Oregon Grape is an erect shrub that reaches 2 meters (6 feet) in height.  It prefers full sun in dry soils from Southern
British Columbia to central Oregon at low to middle elevations.

This shrub has 5-9 leaflets per leaf with small yellow flowers that produce blue berries in the summer.  

This plant is very hardy and deters browsing by animals, such as deer.  Tall Oregon Grape is also highly drought tolerant, perfect for the
Northwest's unpredictability.
Mahonia nervosa - Long-Leaf Oregon Grape is also an erect shrub that reaches .6 meters (2 feet) in height.  It prefers shaded, moist forests at
low to middle elevation in the Willamette Valley.

Long-Leaf Oregon Grape also has small yellow flowers that produce blue berries late in the summer.  To distinguish this shrub from its close
relative, Tall Oregon Grape, look for 9-19 leaflets per leaf.  

This plant is a great ground cover for forested sites.
Oemleria cerasiformis - Indian Plum is a large shrub that can reach heights of 5 meters (16 feet).  It grows in dry to moist woods and stream
banks and will do well in full or partial sun.  This shrub is found at low to middle elevations in the Willamette Valley.

Trees produce either male or female flowers in the early spring.  The flowers are white, some what bell shaped, and produce an unusual
fragrance.  The fruit is a small dark purple plum-like drupe that ripens in late spring or early summer.

Indian Plum is a fast growing shrub, perfect for sites where a root base is needed to prevent erosion.
Malus fusca - Western Crabapple is a 12 meter (39 feet) tree in moist woods, swamps and edges of stream banks.  It is found at low to middle
elevations throughout the Willamette Valley and can tolerate sun or shade.

The plant has showy white flowers with a sweet fragrance.  The fruit is a very small apple that is a bit tart.

This is the only native apple to Oregon and is an important species to include in riparian areas as it is a food source for many types of wildlife.  
Humans have even enjoyed the Crabapple's fruit.
Lonicera Hispidula - California Honeysuckle
Plant Descriptions
Trees and Shrubs
Trees and Shrubs
Herbaceous

Scholls Valley Native Nursery, LLC
PO Box 231088
Tigard, OR 97281

Phone: 503.624.1766
Fax: 503.624.2766
Holodiscus discolor - Oceanspray is an erect shrub that reaches 4 meters (13 feet) in height.  Preferring full sun, it can be found in open
woods, clearings, logged areas, or ravine areas at low to middle elevations.  This shrub can be found from Southern British Columbia to
California in dry or moist soils.

Oceanspray has strong arching branches and produces beautiful cascading bouquets of small, creamy white flowers.  

This plant is an important species in open areas as a food source for many pollinating animals.
Euonymus occidentalis - Western Wahoo is a small shrub that reaches 1 meter (3 feet) in height.  It is found sporadically throughout Oregon
and Washington forests and thickets at low to middle elevations.

The flowers of this plant can be green with purple mottles or purplish red.  The seeds are in capsules of three, which are covered by a reddish
orange aril; much like a cashew.

This species does well in riparian areas with plenty of shade.  It provides a food source for birds and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest.