Sambucus racemosa - Red Elderberry is an erect shrub that reaches 6 meters (20 feet) in height.  It prefers moist sites in the shade  with poor
soils.  This shrub is found throughout the Willamette Valley at sea level to middle elevations.

Red Elderberry can be identified by its 5-7 leaflets, small white flowers grouped together in a pyramidal parasol-like cluster, and bark that is
reddish-brown.  In the early summer, the flowers produce small bright red berries.

This shrub is best used in shady wetlands and moist forested areas.  It provides an excellent food source for birds.  Native people used these
berries in wines, but today is considered inedible.
Rubus spectabilis - Salmonberry is a beautiful erect shrub that reaches 4 meters (13 feet) in height.  It is found throughout the Willamette Valley
at low to subalpine elevations in open forests and stream sides.  Usually found in disturbed sites, this shrub will grow in full to partial sun with
moist to wet soils.

This plant has some thorns with large pink to reddish purple flowers that produce yellow to red berries.  It has golden brown bark with sharply
toothed leaves.

Salmonberry is an excellent species to use in projects that have some disturbance, such as logging.  They grow quickly and form dense
thickets that provide habitat for many birds and mammals.  The berries are a delicious food source for people as well as birds.
Rubus ursinus - Trailing Blackberry is a trailing shrub that reaches 5 meters (16 feet) in length.  This is the only native blackberry found
throughout the Willamette Valley at low to middle elevations.  It prefers dry open forests with full to partial sun.

This plant is distinguishable by its trailing nature, 3 leaflets, and unhooked, unflattened thorns.  The fruits can be identified by their small stature
(1 centimeter) verses the larger fruits of the invasive blackberries (2.5 centimeters).  

Trailing blackberry shrubs are best used in disturbed drier sites.  It is a great food source for birds and humans find the berries quite appetizing
as well.
Salix geyeriana - Geyer's Willow is a slender shrub that reaches 10 meters (33 feet) in height.  It ranges from southwestern British Columbia
down to the Willamette Valley in Oregon.  This shrub prefers wet to moist places along river sides, wet meadows and creeks at low to middle
elevations.

To distinguish this willow from others, look for small leaves (8 centimeters in length), minute stipules, and black bracts in the catkins.

Willows are useful in particularly wet places as they thrive in this environment.  They will contain water logged soils, provide habitat for birds and
wildlife, as well as maintain a healthy wetland.
Salix lasiandra - Pacific Willow is a tall slender shrub that reaches 12 meters (39 feet) in height.  It prefers moist gravelly soils, but can tolerate
dry conditions.  This shrub can be found throughout the Willamette Valley at sea level to middle elevations.

To identify this willow, look for yellow glossy twigs, long leaves (15 centimeters), prominent kidney-shaped stipules, and yellow bracts in the
catkins.

Willows are useful in particularly wet places as they thrive in this environment.  They will contain water logged soils, provide habitat for birds and
wildlife, as well as maintain a healthy wetland.
Salix piperi - Piper Willow is a large shrub that reaches 6 meters (20 feet) in height.  It grows in wet places, such as in wetlands and streams, at
low elevations.  This shrub can be found throughout the Willamette Valley.

This willow is distinguishable from others by its oval shaped leaves, stout twigs, and hairy young branches.

Willows are useful in particularly wet places as they thrive in this environment.  They will contain water logged soils, provide habitat for birds and
wildlife, as well as maintain a healthy wetland.
Salix scouleriana - Scouler's Willow is a tall spindly shrub, which can reach 12 meters (39 feet) in height.  It is an extremely hardy shrub found
throughout the Willamette Valley at low to middle elevations.  This shrub prefers moist sites in open forests, wetlands, clearings and thickets.

To identify this willow, look for soft hairy, egg-shaped leaves.  

Willows are useful in particularly wet places as they thrive in this environment.  They will contain water logged soils, provide habitat for birds and
wildlife, as well as maintain a healthy wetland.
Salix sitchensis - Sitka Willows grow to be 8 meters (26 feet) tall and prefer stream side thickets, open forests, and wetland margins.  It can be
found throughout the Willamette Valley at low to middle elevations.

This willow is distinguishable from others by its densely spreading dark brown branches, dark green broad leaves, and densely hairy leaf
undersides.

Willows are useful in particularly wet places as they thrive in this environment.  They will contain water logged soils, provide habitat for birds and
wildlife, as well as maintain a healthy wetland.
Sambucus cerulea - Blue Elderberry is an erect shrub that reaches 3.5 meters (12 feet) in height.  It is found at low elevations throughout the
Willamette Valley in dry to moist soils with full or partial sun.

This shrub has 5-9 leaflets, small white flowers grouped together in a flat parasol-like cluster, and bark that is bluish green in color.  In the late
summer, the plant produces small blue berries.

This is a fast growing shrub, perfect for drier sites in need of a quick root establishment.  Blue Elderberry provides habitat and a food source for
birds and other wildlife.  Humans also enjoy the blue berries in pies and preservatives, but be sure to cook berries as they have been known to
cause nausea when eaten raw.
Rubus parviflorus - Thimbleberry is an erect shrub that can reach 3 meters (10 feet) in height.  It prefers open sites such as forests, road sides,
and shore lines with moist soils.  This shrub grows at low elevations throughout the Willamette Valley.

This plant is easily identified by its large white flowers that produce thimble-shaped, bright red berries.  Although it is in the raspberry family, this
shrub is thornless.  

Thimbleberry is an excellent plant for use in restoration sites as it will rapidly form a dense thicket.  It provides habitat for many wildlife species
as well as a food source for birds and people.
Plant Descriptions
Trees and Shrubs
Trees and Shrubs
Herbaceous
Scholls Valley Native Nursery, LLC
PO Box 231088
Tigard, OR 97281

Phone: 503.624.1766
Fax: 503.624.2766
Salix rigida – Mackenzie’s willow is a fast-growing riparian species found at low to moderate elevations, at sites with moderate to high water
levels.  This shrub ranges from 2-9 meters (6-30 feet) in height.  

Mackenzie’s willow has leaves that are dark green above, and pale beneath, with a heart-shaped leaf base, and tapered tips, distinguishing it
from our other local willows.  

This is another great willow to add diversity to riparian plantings.  
Rubus leucodermis - Blackcap is an erect arching shrub that reaches 2 meters (7 feet) in height. It is found throughout the Willamette Valley at
low to middle elevations in disturbed sites, open forests and thickets.

This plant belongs to the raspberry family and has 3 egg-shaped leaflets with shiny white undersides. The flowers are small, white and in
clusters of 3-7 on the terminal branches.

This species is used in sites that have been disturbed as it will spread, but not considered invasive. Especially useful in sites where fire has
played a role.